Interstellar – A Charitable Appeal

by pasdelabas

Interstellar was made by Christopher Nolan of Batman fame. The film was okay to watch but was too ridden with necessary and partially controlling narrative features and symbolic placements. The film is sentimental in a properly gooey fashion and carries with it a message that does nothing other than make a statement of the current ideology. Technology is the only real saviour for the human race. Love may be the vector for human direction but it is only important because it is active in the survival of the technologist. Whilst he starts the film as a farmer he is a technical food producer. He wishes that he had never left his children behind once he realises that he is not going to be saving them. He saves the world only in the sense that he does eventually save them, or her at least. The rest of the world, which means human beings, dies. So whilst love is this vitally important force, its pursuit does not ensure its survival other than as a part of a technological package. Whilst the audience is sufficiently ironic to recognise the formulaic romantic story being enacted, nevertheless what we are left with is the basic story: love conquers all, machines will lead us out of this. What is the film precisely doing? Making that statement is nothing other than the voice of those people living within the technological world on which the material of the film depends upon. That we might be led out of the darkness does not exist in the material world of those in poverty other than as a religious myth. The poor may well believe in love and the conquering spirit, but they will not be transported to Paradise. Neither will we. Unless we sit in the seat of the spacecraft or pronounce the words Eureka for real. We are the trusting subjects of the space program.

That is the materiality of the programme, it is best understood rather as a charity letter received through the post, appealing for our continued support.

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